Count the cost of the cat

cutecatWhen I take a cat to be neutered, I sometimes wonder why the general public too often fail to get their cats neutered.

Of course, there are those people who get caught out when their kitten falls pregnant at 4 months. When you buy, get given, or take in a kitten, the chances are it is un-neutered. So why not start a KITTY fund, while the kitten is small, by putting money aside each week to help pay for ongoing costs? For those of you who are having financial difficulties, there is help in the form of vouchers from the RSPCA, The Blue Cross, and the PDSA, but you are still expected to have a kitty fund to help out.

Although I have mentioned female kittens, the males need doing too. This is cheaper as the operation is easier, but it is just as important. Once the males start roaming after females (and they will travel an 8 mile radius possibly getting run over in the process) they will get into fights, cause damage to other people’s cats, and pass on diseases to both males and females. And they will make your house stink with their male smell, ugh!

With this in mind, when someone offers you a kitten that they want rid of, do you think hard about the financial side? We at Sunshine Cat Rescue, discuss with our clients the costs to them of taking on a kitten. These are the costs.

It will need vaccinations two to three weeks apart and a booster every year (these are very important to keep your cat in good health). Then there is regular flea and worming treatment and weekly food bills, the equipment needed, bed, scratch-post, toys etc. And of course the neutering – in total around £150. Finally there are the vet bills if the kitten you have taken on turns out to have a disease. At least if it comes from a rescue centre or registered breeder, a vet should have checked it.

All rescue centres are overrun at this time of year. When they take in all these kittens, they then have no room for the needy cases, strays, or for cats that need re-homing, and it has a knock on effect.

So please think before you let your cat have kittens. One cat will produce 20,000 descendants in 5 years. Pretty scary wouldn’t you say?

August – September 2017